Child Beauty Pageant: Winning and Losing Talent Performances

Observing child beauty pageants together is a great way coach your child through the do’s and don’ts of winning or losing performances. If your child is competing in beauty pageants, it is wise to order the Videos observe what choices and habits make contestants winners or losers.

Winning performances at child beauty pageants:

• Feel the performance: One pageant talent winner in particular, sang a song that while not necessarily popular, told a story. In addition, but her body language and facial expression told the story too. It did not hurt that she had a great soprano voice for a child under 10.

• Wow the crowd: Judges at child beauty pageants also notice the reaction of the crowd. If your dance routine involves stunts few others cannot do, then go for it! Flexibility helps!

Losing performances at child beauty pageants

• Be yourself. A Shirley Temple impression, while adorable, is just an impression. After a certain age, it’s time to form your own performance style.

• Painful to the ears: Get an impartial person to listen to you sing when preparing for your child beauty pageant, if you sing off key or just not well at all chose another talent. If you sing OK, take lessons to get better.

• Forgetting lyrics. A big no-no at child beauty pageants, especially when you are singing a popular song and everyone else knows the lyrics.

• Poorly played instrument. At a girl’s pageant, a performance that sound like you are tuning a guitar will not be understood. However, in a school talent contest, I might go over well.

• Background louder than singer: Singing should be louder than the background music. Try to use music with only background vocals in a child pageant, not a track with the main lyrics to the song.

At child beauty pageants watch out for:

• Natural Pageants prefer performances not be over staged. This means paying more attention to the camera that to what you are doing and choreography planned with camera poses. It gets annoying to the audience and judges. You would never find a regular tap dance performer stopping in the middle for a photograph.

• Classical music is great, but for talent contests, something more popular is appreciated, unless you are especially gifted.

• Have copies of your music, sometimes a disk that worked previously, may not work later.

• Clothing should fit. If your dress is too tight, short, or falling off one shoulder, it will take attention away from your performance.

• Know when to stop. Practice with your music and make sure your DJ knows when to stop the track. It is embarrassing if you keep singing after the music has stopped.

• Too short: Don’t leave them asking if you were really finished, or just quit. If the time limit is 2 minutes, try to do at least one and a half.